LLB Part I enrolment & non-law courses


#1

What’s the difference between applying for an LLB part I conjoint versus just the Laws first year programme on its own? Also when it comes to the non-law courses, are their any tips on how one might select or plan these (is it better to choose papers based on what you’re interested in/where your strengths lie/ what you plan to focus on if accepted into part II)? Thanks


#2

On your first question: What’s the difference between applying for an LLB part I conjoint versus just the Laws first year programme on its own?

Every student needs to take a conjoint in Year 1 so you have no option to just do the law first year program on its own. The reason why this is the case is so that if you don’t get into law, you are still enrolled in a degree program. After you get into law, you can then opt to drop your conjoint degree and focus on the law degree but for the first year you have to do both.

On your second question: When it comes to the non-law courses, are their any tips on how one might select or plan these?

Yes, this is a delicate choice. I’ll give you some pragmatic advice that you probably won’t hear very often but should listen too:

  1. Don’t take anything you are really bad at. University is not the place to explore the areas you are actually bad at. If you are really bad at mathematics, don’t study it at university. Bad course results lowers your GPA which lowers your competitive for careers or post-graduate study or honors and will also hurt your mental health as you feel stressed.
  2. Take university courses that either i) help you to build a core competency and skill which you can try and become the “best” at or ii) enable you to explore a new area which adds a new paradigm of thought or analysis to your tool kit. For example, I took one class in nutrition and global health which was very different to my traditional studies in Applied Mathematics and I learnt a lot about a whole new interesting field which gave me a new lens to think through problems with.
  3. Unless you’re sure about why you are taking a specific class, always take courses which help you meet your degree requirements. In my degree, literally every single class I took met a requirement. If I had a high conviction in a course which wouldn’t have helped me meet a requirement, I would have taken it but in the absence of this, take something that helps you finish up your degree.
  4. I recommend pursuing a conjoint anyways because for 1 extra year you get 1 extra degree so I would take courses in the first year that would go towards your extra degree with the assumption you will continue that degree.

Hope that helps! Feel free to follow up


#4

Yes, apply for the conjoint