Could someone please gauge my academic profile and advise me on my extracurricular choices before applying to MIT, Stanford and the Ivy Leagues

Hi all!
I a Year 11 Indian student aiming for MIT (primarily) and the Ivy Leagues. I’ve heard that selective schools in the US require a ton of extracurricular activities coupled with stellar grades. As a result, I’m confused and cannot really gauge how competitive I am for MIT and the Ivies. Kindly gauge my academic profile over my high school years as well as the extracurricular activities that I have participated in:

  1. 85% in the 9th, 95% in the 10th (all final exams only - throughout the year, they are a mixture between 85 and 90%). Gradewise, I’ve achieved A* through A-s

  2. OLYMPIADS : Participated in the Math, Science, Cyber and English Olympiads and got medals (school level only) in the 9th and 10th grade

  3. 9th grade : Apart from winning an essay-writing competition in school, nothing much to say about extracurricular activities

  4. 10th grade: Member of the school magazine (we brought out 2 editions of the magazine in the year). I, along with two others, helped organize an intra-school Science and Tech fest in our school

  5. Over the summer before my 11th grade, I learnt Python and created a chatbot (at home - no societal impact)

As I said, since I wasn’t truly aware of the impact of extracurricular activities, I haven’t really participated much. I do plan on improving my extracurricular strength coupled with near-perfect grades through the year.

I’m interested in Software and Electronics - Could you suggest some extracurricular activities that i could do before applying to college, that would have a significant impact on my application?

PS: Will the grades that I have mentioned above be MIT or Ivy-worthy?

Thanks a ton,
Jason

Hi Jason,

ACADEMICS

With A* and As through 9th and 10th, you’re setting yourself up for success, which is great considering academic achievement is far and away the most important criterion in selection of students (as you well know).

That said, there was no mention in your post of past, present and future relevant coursework as it pertains to your interest in studying electrical engineering and computer science (EECS) at university. Across-the-board As and A*s is fantastic, but the makeup of that achievement matters even more in speaking to your ability to survive and thrive in a place like MIT.

OLYMPIADS

Medaling at the school level is a great start and an intimation of your interest and achievement in coursework above and beyond what’s offered in the classroom. That said, recognition at national and international levels of Olympiads or other academic competitions (think Intel ISEF and similar opportunities) make for truly standout candidates.

9th and 10th grade

Essay competitions, school magazines and other ventures complement what should otherwise be a very CS/engineering-focused CV by the end of your high school career. These former efforts, if continued to be pursued at relatively high levels, may be unique selling points in your profile when compared to other students demonstrating interest in EECS.

11th and 12th Grade

That said, this comparative advantage may exist if and only if in G11 and G12 you pursue more EECS-aligned extracurricular opportunities. You should consider starting first, though, with understanding your post-university options in EECS. What is it you actually want to do with the degree? This will help drive the direction you take your efforts today and over the next two years.

I recommend contacting one of our Academic Advisors Ben Thomas (b.thomas@crimsoneducation.org) who can better understand your context and advise on next steps to catapult your candidacy.

Best,
Geoff

Hey! Thanks for the reply @g.kyi !

Yes, i understand my extracurricular activities aren’t quite aligned to EECS - this owes itself to the fact that i wasn’t quite aware of the importance of extracurriculars. That said, as i begin my 11th grade, I will try to align them with EECS.

May i ask if there are global events related to EECS ( which do not involve research) - Online competitions if possible?

Thanks a ton,
Jason